AI looks at Ink blots

Reminds me of my tea leaf reading bot project that I still haven’t started. Someone is gonna beat me to it, and it will be a sad day.

AI looks at Ink blots

View story at Medium.com

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What is Solarpunk?

What is Solarpunk?

This is an interesting write-up about solarpunk subculture.

Solarpunk Anarchist

From the perspective of the early 21st century, things look pretty grim. A deadly cocktail of crises engulf the people of planet Earth and all other forms of biotic life which share it: a geopolitical crisis, an economic crisis, and a worsening ecological crisis due to global warming, which stems from a political-economic system that requires fossil fuels to power its technostructure.

Culture, having as it does a symbiotic relationship with material conditions, reflects a lot of these crises in fiction and the arts. The 2000s and 2010s were replete with apocalyptic imagery of a future ravaged by war, totalitarianism, runaway weapons technology, killer viruses, zombies, and environmental collapse. Not that such narratives are unneeded. At best, they can serve as a wake-up call for those caught up in the myth that we had reached the “end of history” with the fall of the Berlin Wall and the triumph of…

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Geoengineering vs. Greenhouse gasses

Geoengineering vs. Greenhouse gasses- Who would win?

This week is apparently a week where the UN  has met to discuss the state of the oceans. Since it is one of our most pressing issues, I figured I’d learn more and haphazardly blog them as part of my initiative to kaizenize my blog. But given the huge interest in climate change- I have been wondering where the news covfefe about this has been? *snort* It’s sad that the US is not a member of the Paris agreement, but the people still can be.

Climate engineering would cool down the planet — but it may not save West Antarctica  is a critical view of geoengineering which as a nerd I of course would want to propose. I learned that the West Antarctica ice sheet is melting not only from above but from below because of how CO2 is affecting the currents. I thought about it and considered that here is a
reminder that when we think about climate, we should be picturing a circulatory system….
We thinkScreen Shot 2017-06-08 at 7.55.48 PM

But we should also think
3d4ddl

Really grateful to my bestie’s husband for alerting me to the awesome work of suspicious0bservers… probably 3ish years ago? That’s how I know these maps even exists. There are always a copious amount of links under their videos. A true ‘web site’ there is a node devoted to the climate – Earth changes.  If you’re in the spirit to learn more about the situation we’re in and like to watch videos.

For me to read later: New Insights on the Physical Nature of the Atmospheric Greenhouse Effect Deduced from an Empirical Planetary Temperature Model

http://on.forbes.com/60168YNCY
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-24033772

I for one, welcome our new robot overlords

When Does Labor Scarcity Encourage Innovation?

This paper studies whether labor scarcity encourages technological advances, that is, technology adoption or innovation, for example, as claimed by Habakkuk in the context of nineteenth-century United States. I define technology as strongly labor saving if technological advances reduce the marginal product of labor and as strongly labor complementary if they increase it. I show that labor scarcity encourages technological advances if technology is strongly labor saving and will discourage them if technology is strongly labor complementary. I also show that technology can be strongly labor saving in plausible environments but not in many canonical macroeconomic models

LABOR- AND CAPITAL-AUGMENTING TECHNICAL CHANGE

I analyze an economy in which firms can undertake both labor- and capital-augmenting technological improvements. In the long run, the economy resembles the standard growth model with purely labor-augmenting technical change, and the share of labor in GDP is constant. Along the transition path, however, there is capital-augmenting technical change and factor shares change. Tax policy and changes in labor supply or savings typically change factor shares in the short run, but have no or little effect on the long-run factor distribution of income.

The Race Between Machine and Man: Implications of Technology for Growth, Factor Shares and Employment

The advent of automation and the simultaneous decline in the labor share and employment among advanced economies raise concerns that labor will be marginalized and made redundant by new technologies. We examine this proposition using a task-based framework in which tasks previously performed by labor can be automated and more complex versions of existing tasks, in which labor has a comparative advantage, can be created. We characterize the equilibrium in this model and establish how the available technologies and the choices of firms between producing with capital or labor determine factor prices and the allocation of factors to tasks. In a static version of our model where capital is fixed and technology is exogenous, automation reduces employment and the share of labor in national income and may even reduce wages, while the creation of more complex tasks has the opposite effects. Our full model endogenizes capital accumulation and the direction of research towards automation and the creation of new complex tasks. Under reasonable conditions, there exists a stable balanced growth path in which the two types of innovations go hand-in-hand. An increase in automation reduces the cost of producing using labor, and thus discourages further automation and encourages the faster creation of new complex tasks. The endogenous response of technology restores the labor share and employment back to their initial level. Although the economy contains powerful self-correcting forces, the equilibrium generates too much automation. Finally, we extend the model to include workers of different skills. We find that inequality increases during transitions, but the self-correcting forces in our model also limit the increase in inequality over the long-run.