Pathless land

I maintain that Truth is a pathless land, and you cannot approach it by any path whatsoever, by any religion, by any sect. That is my point of view, and I adhere to that absolutely and unconditionally. Truth, being limitless, unconditioned, unapproachable by any path whatsoever, cannot be organized; nor should any organization be formed to lead or to coerce people along any particular path.

-Krishnamurti

Is the truth pathless? I think truth is a path, but specifically an arbitrary path. We experience it on the level where we are interpreting many arbitrary paths working in tandem with our senses. We build systems of systems of representations in order to handle the stochastic behavior of our environment.  Our mind is equipped with the biological technology required to continuously improve our representational systems with time and experience and adapt to the unexpected.
I do agree that organizations should not be formed to coerce anyone.  However, I think that organizations formed to lead people are unavoidable and I disagree that they shouldn’t be formed. There are, of course, many weaknesses that organizations can experience. Just like people study can psychology and neuroscience to understand themselves, they can study sociology, history, and rhetoric to understand how to diagnose those problems in their organization. But as an organization’s weaknesses are as unavoidable as our cognitive weaknesses, there is benefit of a multiplicity of specialized organizations, because they create diversity in a “pool of truth” that can be used to adapt “guesses at the truth” to the unexpected or to new information.

“Her Path to Divinity” Bryan Kent Ward 

 

Perspective-making, perspective-taking

[…] consciousness is so much more than an evolutionary accident or epiphenomenal to biochemical processes in our heads — consciousness is, in fact, fundamentally woven into the universe itself. […] What we are saying is that some degree of subjectivity is indeed present all the way up and all the way down the evolutionary ladder, from the tiniest quarks to the biggest brains. This consciousness can be loosely described as a ‘perspective-making, perspective-taking’ system that creates, collects, and organizes deeper, wider, more sophisticated points-of-view as it develops.

Ken Wilber & Allan Combs (2010)

Rings Aesop Rock

I left some seasons eager to fall
I left some work to bury alive
I let my means of being dissolve
I let my person curl up and die
Eating up his innards, an unfeasible anxiety
Has brutally committed to relinquishing his privacy
Aligning with the trials of the anti-Midas
Nap on the back lawn, look up in the sky, it’s…

Shapes falling out of the fringe
All heart, though we would’ve made cowardly kings
They will chop you down just to count your rings
Just to count your rings, just to count your rings
-Rings, Aesop Rock

Help yourself

Do not believe in something because it is reported. Do not believe in something because it has been practiced by generations or becomes a tradition or part of a culture. Do not believe in something because a scripture says it is so. Do not believe in something believing a god has inspired it. Do not believe in something a teacher tells you to. Do not believe in something because the authorities say it is so. Do not believe in hearsay, rumor, speculative opinion, public opinion, or mere acceptance to logic and inference alone. Help yourself, accept as completely true only that which is praised by the wise and which you test for yourself and know to be good for yourself and others.

The Kalama Sutta, Anguttara Nikaya 3.65, Sutta Pitaka, Pali Canon

Torus Energy - Jack Lightfoot | "I see":

Torus Energy – Jack Lightfoot | “I see”

Excerpt from Meat the Benign Extravagance

Only a few from what were many bullet points where Simon Farlie, author, described characteristics a low-carbon mixed (omnivorous and vegan) agriculture.

  • A highly reruralized society would see a revival of fairs, not unlike the growing number of festivals that embellish the modern English summer, but with stalls that purveyed the practical as well as the fanciful, and plenty of dealing in horses, livestock, cheese, and the like. ‘When fairs were frequent shops were not necessary,’ says Cobbett with characteristic hyperbole, and he goes on to explain:
    A manufacturer of shoes, of stockings, of hats, of almost anything that man wants, could manufacture at home in an obscure hamlet, with cheap house rent, good air, and plenty of room. He need pay no heavy rent for a shop; and no disadvantages from confined situation; and then by attending three or four or five or six fairs in a year, he sold the work of his hands, unloaded with a heavy expense attending the keeping of a shop. He would get more for ten shillings in a booth at a fair or market than he would get in a shop for twenty pounds.
    Anybody who doubts the ability of society entirely dependent upon animal traction to shift large volumes of material, or who thinks that country life before the motor vehicle must have been boring, should read Defoe’s description of Sturbridge fair, an event the size of Glastonbury Festival, but with no entrance fee or security fence, and lasting many days longer.
  • In some circumstances it might be more economic to employ a shepherd/cowherd to guard ruminants, rather than to fence them. This has advantages for animal welfare (disease is more readily spotted) and for land management (grazing of different areas can be calibrated by the shepherd, and overgrazed areas such as riverbanks avoided).
  • Some herd of ruminants would be returned to barns or folded on fields at night to supply manure.
  • There might be a return to the formerly widespread practice – still found in Eastern Europe – of family-owned dairy cows being collected by the community shepherd after milking in the morning and returned for milking in the evening after a day in common pastures. There are great advantages to this system: it uses economies of scale where they exist (in grazing and bull provision), but spreads the burden where scale is a disadvantage (in handmilking and veterinary care); it distributes milk to every family participating in the scheme; and gives every participating family a stake in the management of village lands, and the economic and emotional satisfaction of owning a cow. The same system was used on the Eastern coast of the United States, prior to the days of barbed wire. Defoe describes this system operating in Cheddar where ‘the whole village are cowkeepers’ and ‘before the village is a large green, or common, a piece of ground in which the whole herd of the cows, belonging to the town, do feed’. Milk not consumed at home was turned into a single huge cheese at the co-operative dairy (another operation where economies of scale are a great advantage); but families were paid, when they had contributed enough gallons, with a huge cheese weighing up to a hundredweight. which it was their responsibility to sell: “Thus every man has equal justice, and though he should have but one cow, he shall, in time, have one whole cheese’.

Each generation has its own task

Kierkegaard believed “each generation has its own task and need not trouble itself unduly by being everything to previous and succeeding generations”. In an earlier book he had said, “to a certain degree every generation and every individual begins his life from the beginning”, and in another, “no generation has learned to love from another, no generation is able to begin at any other point than the beginning”, “no generation learns the essentially human from a previous one”.