Team uses fractal geometry to build lighter structures

Team uses fractal geometry to build lighter structures

Down the rabbit hole, what can I say. But it is exciting to realize that the fractal structures that 3D printing handles well turn out to be useful for building light, structurally sound supports. Space elevator, here we come.

Definitely, anyone who works on the problem of solving the printing discontinuities that sometimes arise will do quite the service to humankind. My first thought is to have a printer that can see a layer it has printed and compare it to what it is supposed to print. If this printer can also remove and add material precisely, then it could possibly reverse some of these errors. Perhaps we could somehow include the commands it needs to compute how to reverse the error it has detected, based on type and location, using a process similar to the forward error correction method. I am thinking along these lines because I figure you do not want your machine to have to turn itself off and throw an error and require human intervention. But usually a printer does not rewrite the file mid-print. Hence, encoding redundant information. It would have to be able to respond to the complex realities of misprint. It would be challenging, but within the realm of possibility.

Colors of Infinity- Arthur C. Clarke’s documentary on fractals

Today I learned about the Buddhabrot, a novel view of the Mandelbrot set that looks like a meditating Buddha. In searching for more information about it, I discovered this documentary on fractals by famous science and science fiction writer Arthur. C. Clarke. View scenes of beautifully illustrated mandelbrots with 60s musical accompaniment, and hear notable speakers, including Stephen Hawking, comment on the various contributions fractals have made to our understanding of natural forms. It’s about an hour long, a great way to unwind in the evening.¬†Enjoy!