Exerpt from Zeitgeist II with John Perkins

To hear more from John Perkins: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSs79-RxOdRkgiOp5asra5Q/videos

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Reading List 12/28/17

Currently reading Who Rules the World? by Noam Chomsky. Below referenced directly or from rabbit trail.

The U.S. Has Way Too Many Secrets

Testing Theories of American Politics: Elites, Interest Groups, and Average Citizens

CARNEGIE EXPERTS ON DEMOCRACY AND RULE OF LAW

Plutonomy: Buying Luxury, Explaining Global Imbalances

Engaging North Korea II: Evidence from the Clinton Administration

UNITED NATIONS RELIEF, WORKS AGENCY FOR PALESTINE REFUGEES COPES WITH MAJOR CRISES IN THREE FIELDS OF OPERATIONS, COMMISSIONER-GENERAL TELLS FOURTH COMMITTEE (2008)

Kissinger Gave Green Light for Israeli Offensive Violating 1973 Cease-Fire

Of Revolutions, Regime Change, and State Collapse in the Arab World

The New Freedom: A Call for the Emancipation of the Generous Energies of a People

Link to wikisource
“All over the Union people are coming to feel that they have no control over the course of affairs. I live in one of the greatest States in the union, which was at one time in slavery. Until two years ago we had witnessed with increasing concern the growth in New Jersey of a spirit of almost cynical despair. Men said: “We vote; we are offered the platform we want; we elect the men who stand on that platform, and we get absolutely nothing.” So they began to ask: “What is the use of voting? We know that the machines of both parties are subsidized by the same persons, and therefore it is useless to turn in either direction.”

This is not confined to some of the state governments and those of some of the towns and cities. We know that something intervenes between the people of the United States and the control of their own affairs at Washington. It is not the people who have been ruling there of late.

Why are we in the presence, why are we at the threshold, of a revolution? Because we are profoundly disturbed by the influences which we see reigning in the determination of our public life and our public policy. There was a time when America was blithe with self-confidence. She boasted that she, and she alone, knew the processes of popular government; but now she sees her sky overcast; she sees that there are at work forces which she did not dream of in her hopeful youth.

Don’t you know that some man with eloquent tongue, without conscience, who did not care for the nation, could put this whole country into a flame? Don’t you know that this country from one end to the other believes that something is wrong? What an opportunity it would be for some man without conscience to spring up and say: “This is the way. Follow me!”—and lead in paths of destruction!

The old order changeth—changeth under our very eyes, not quietly and equably, but swiftly and with the noise and heat and tumult of reconstruction.”

“Good temper, the wisdom that comes of sober counsel, the energy of thoughtful and unselfish men, the habit of co-operation and of compromise which has been bred in us by long years of free government, in which reason rather than passion has been made to prevail by the sheer virtue of candid and universal debate, will enable us to win through to still another great age without violence.”

High crimes and misdemeanors

“It is indispensable that some provision should be made for defending the Community agst [against] the incapacity, negligence, or perfidy of the chief Magistrate. The limitation of the period of his service was not a sufficient security. He might lose his capacity after his appointment. He might pervert his administration into a scheme of peculation or oppression. He might betray his trust to foreign powers… In the case of the Executive Magistracy, which was to be administered by a single man, loss of capacity or corruption, was more within the compass of probable events, and either of them might be fatal to the Republic.” – Speech at the Constitutional Convention, July 20, 1787

“The subject of [impeachment’s] jurisdiction are those offences which proceed from the misconduct of public men, or in other words from the abuse or violation of some public trust. They are of a nature which may with peculiar propriety be denominated political, as they relate chiefly to injuries done immediately to the society itself.” – James Madison, The Federalist

“Since 1386, the English parliament had used “high crimes and misdemeanors” as one of the grounds to impeach officials of the crown. Officials accused of “high crimes and misdemeanors” were accused of offenses as varied as misappropriating government funds, appointing unfit subordinates, not prosecuting cases, not spending money allocated by Parliament, promoting themselves ahead of more deserving candidates, threatening a grand jury, disobeying an order from Parliament, arresting a man to keep him from running for Parliament, losing a ship by neglecting to moor it, helping “suppress petitions to the King to call a Parliament,” granting warrants without cause, and bribery. Some of these charges were crimes. Others were not. The one common denominator in all these accusations was that the official had somehow abused the power of his office and was unfit to serve.” From: http://www.crf-usa.org/impeachment/high-crimes-and-misdemeanors.html