Botany @ Project Gutenberg

 

“Erce, Erce, Erce, Mother of Earth!

May the All-Wielder, Ever Lord grant thee 

Acres a-waxing, upwards a-growing 

Pregnant [with corn] and plenteous in strength;

Hosts of [grain] shafts and of glittering plants!Of broad barley the blossoms

And of white wheat ears waxing,

Of the whole earth the harvest!

Let be guarded the grain against all the ills

That are sown o’er the land by the sorcery men,

Nor let cunning women change it nor a crafty man.”

The Old English Herbals by Eleanour Sinclair Rohde

THE Botanical Magazine; OR, Flower-Garden Displayed  by William Curtis describes itself as presenting “The most Ornamental Foreign Plants, cultivated in the Open Ground, the Green-House, and the Stove, are accurately represented in their natural Colours.”  [another Project Gutenberg find]

The Complete Herbal by Nicholas Culpeper has an occult approach to herbalism and discusses cures at length. However one might feel about the possibility of such things, anyone can probably enjoy the beginning, which contains 10 botanical plates like the below.

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Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure by William Thomas Fernie doesn’t have any pretty pictures, but it does have some awesome poetry about herbs.

“She wrapped it up, and for its tomb did choose
A garden pot, wherein she laid it by,
And covered it with mould, and o’er it set
Sweet Basil, which her tears kept ever wet.”

-Keats

 Herbals, Their Origin and Evolution: A Chapter in the History of Botany by Agnes Arber teaches known botany “until the time of the printed press”, an old book, still kinda neat, and has many botanical illustrations including the below.

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Project Gutenburg on Fungus

Was thinking- hey- wonder what Project Gutenberg has on fungi and mycology.

 

Fungi: Their Nature and Uses by M. C. Cooke looks like a very in depth text. It’s written in a lilted style and looks to be chocked with information and illustrations.

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Fungi: their Nature and Uses 

A beginner-targeted, pop-sci pproach to mycology is promised by Among the Mushrooms: A Guide For Beginners by Burgin and Dallas.

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Führer für Pilzfreunde by Edmund Michael is in german, but it has  39 amazing illustrations of mushrooms, such as the below

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Two books offer a focus on edibility  Student’s Hand-book of Mushrooms of America, Edible and Poisonous by Thomas Taylor and The Mushroom, Edible and Otherwise by Miron Elisha Hard.

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 Student’s Hand-book of Mushrooms of America, Edible and Poisonous

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Assorted Wikisource

Wikisource is a bit underrated as projects go I think….

Every time I visit though, I collect a ton of things I want to read. I will never be able to read everything I want to. But here is what seemed most interesting to me and we’ll see what I actually end up reading later.

The Subjection of Women John Stuart Mill

Beauty and the Beast Atlantic Monthly

My Bondage and My Freedom Frederick Douglas

A History of the Freedom of Thought

Anarchism and Other Essays by Emma Goldman [This one I actually read in paper form, when I was in college, great to see it for free (myself only paid $1 for the paper copy)]

What is Property? by Pierre-Joseph Proudhon

The Science of Rights by Fichte

The Natural History of Chocolate

Earth Worms and their Wonderful Works Popular Science

The Sewing Machine in Political Economy Popular Science

The Purification of Sewer Waters Popular Science

The Sanitation of Air Popular Science

The Allinson Vegetarian Cooking Book

Also just a friendly reminder that you can read HP Lovecraft @ Wikisource 

Excerpt from Manufacturing Consent 

The United States attacked South Vietnam, arguably by 1962 and unquestionably by 1965, expanding its aggression to all of Indochina with lethal and long-term effects. Media coverage or other commentary on these events that does not begin by recognizing these essential facts is mere apologetics for terrorism and murderous aggression. The United States was “defending South Vietnam” in the same sense in which the Soviet Union is “defending Afghanistan.”

In a revealing article entitled “Lessons of Running Viets’ War,” published in August 1987, Stanley Karnow, a veteran Asia correspondent and author of a highly regarded liberal history of the Vietnam War, argues that the United States erred in Vietnam because it allowed the Vietnamese people to depend too heavily on us. 47 Reciprocally, the South Vietnamese people also “allowed themselves to be lulled into a complacent sense of dependency on the United States,” thinking we wouldn’t back down, not realizing that small clients are expendable. The South Vietnamese people who fought the U.S. invasion are never mentioned, or considered to be “South Vietnamese” within Karnow’s patriotic frame, although they constituted the majority of the population and the only serious political force…

We cannot quite say that the propaganda model is verified in the case of the Indochina wars, since it fails to predict such extraordinary, far-reaching, and exceptionless subservience to the state propaganda system. The fact that this judgment is correct—as it plainly is—is startling enough. Even more revealing with regard to Western intellectual culture is that the simple facts cannot be perceived, and their import lies far beyond the bounds of the thinkable.

You can also read an excerpt from Manufacturing Consent about the Freedom of the Press here: https://chomsky.info/consent02/

Excerpt from Meat the Benign Extravagance

Only a few from what were many bullet points where Simon Farlie, author, described characteristics a low-carbon mixed (omnivorous and vegan) agriculture.

  • A highly reruralized society would see a revival of fairs, not unlike the growing number of festivals that embellish the modern English summer, but with stalls that purveyed the practical as well as the fanciful, and plenty of dealing in horses, livestock, cheese, and the like. ‘When fairs were frequent shops were not necessary,’ says Cobbett with characteristic hyperbole, and he goes on to explain:
    A manufacturer of shoes, of stockings, of hats, of almost anything that man wants, could manufacture at home in an obscure hamlet, with cheap house rent, good air, and plenty of room. He need pay no heavy rent for a shop; and no disadvantages from confined situation; and then by attending three or four or five or six fairs in a year, he sold the work of his hands, unloaded with a heavy expense attending the keeping of a shop. He would get more for ten shillings in a booth at a fair or market than he would get in a shop for twenty pounds.
    Anybody who doubts the ability of society entirely dependent upon animal traction to shift large volumes of material, or who thinks that country life before the motor vehicle must have been boring, should read Defoe’s description of Sturbridge fair, an event the size of Glastonbury Festival, but with no entrance fee or security fence, and lasting many days longer.
  • In some circumstances it might be more economic to employ a shepherd/cowherd to guard ruminants, rather than to fence them. This has advantages for animal welfare (disease is more readily spotted) and for land management (grazing of different areas can be calibrated by the shepherd, and overgrazed areas such as riverbanks avoided).
  • Some herd of ruminants would be returned to barns or folded on fields at night to supply manure.
  • There might be a return to the formerly widespread practice – still found in Eastern Europe – of family-owned dairy cows being collected by the community shepherd after milking in the morning and returned for milking in the evening after a day in common pastures. There are great advantages to this system: it uses economies of scale where they exist (in grazing and bull provision), but spreads the burden where scale is a disadvantage (in handmilking and veterinary care); it distributes milk to every family participating in the scheme; and gives every participating family a stake in the management of village lands, and the economic and emotional satisfaction of owning a cow. The same system was used on the Eastern coast of the United States, prior to the days of barbed wire. Defoe describes this system operating in Cheddar where ‘the whole village are cowkeepers’ and ‘before the village is a large green, or common, a piece of ground in which the whole herd of the cows, belonging to the town, do feed’. Milk not consumed at home was turned into a single huge cheese at the co-operative dairy (another operation where economies of scale are a great advantage); but families were paid, when they had contributed enough gallons, with a huge cheese weighing up to a hundredweight. which it was their responsibility to sell: “Thus every man has equal justice, and though he should have but one cow, he shall, in time, have one whole cheese’.